Showing posts with label Appalachia - Upper East TN. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Appalachia - Upper East TN. Show all posts

Saturday, September 24, 2022

BLUE HORSE NOTEBOOK PAPER (published 9-24-2022, article #359)

Introduction

Howdy, y'all! Yesterday, in this neck of the woods, the low was 46F, about 7 AM. The sky was crisp and blue. Fall is in the air finally! It's about time. Today, I hope that the clouds bring some much needed rain.

As a side note, on 9/21/2022, “Microcrap” presented an update, which I installed successfully, in the late afternoon. The next morning, however, my “Winders” Live Mail 2012 wouldn't create or reply to emails. (The software had been working fine before the update.) Yesterday morning, I uninstalled the 9/21/2022 “Microcrap” update. My email software works fine again. I won!

Getting back to the topic, do my northeast Tennessee readers, who have some age on them, remember Blue Horse notebook paper? I hear some readers saying “yes!” To my readers who don't know, please read on! Well, those who know may want to read a while longer.

Inspiration for this Article

I'd started this draft, on 7/29/2022 (a Friday). That morning, Phil Williams (on The Phil Show, NewsTalk 98.7 FM), talked about Blue Horse notebook paper. (I listen to him, at times, while I'm conducting my morning ritual.)

That brought a few memories, from my mental backwaters, to the forefront. I thought: “Blue Horse notebook paper. Hum. What can I find on the 'Interweb?'”

Blue Horse Notebook Paper on the “Interweb”

After my morning ritual, of 7/29/2022, I searched the “Interweb” for “Blue Horse notebook paper.” After scrolling past all the advertisements, the first actual article (that didn't want money) was on the Johnson City Press (Johnson City, TN) website.

The article is: “Remembering when Montag's Blue Horse galloped across the country dispersing Blue Horse label notebook paper,” by Bob Cox, Johnson City Press, 9/7/2019.

The article denotes an old Blue Horse notebook paper advertisement, to girls and boys, for various prizes. The image, below, is from that article.

A photo of the Blue Horse emblem and some advertisements for the big contest the brand put on. Contributed/Bob Cox.

Montag, which started in 1945, made Blue Horse notebook paper. Montag & Caldwell's website article – M&C Celebrates A 75 Year History: The Story Behind Montag & Caldwell, 11/16/2020 – mentions Blue Horse notebook paper, as a note in their historical details.

Deeper “Interweb” Digging - Bob Cox

The 9/7/2019 Johnson City Press article includes a link to: Bob Cox's Yesteryear: Documenting the Nostalgic History of Upper East Tennessee. His latest articles are three, from 8/8/2019. His website isn't active.

But wait! Box Cox has an active “Bob Cox's Yesteryear” personal blog on Facebook! If you have a “Farcebook” – as I call it – account, then you will find him, still writing and publishing, there. I'm glad that he's still active somewhere.

My Blue Horse Coaster

On 8/12/2022 (a Friday) -- while I was shop vacuuming Molly's “basement condominium,” to suck up all the doggy sheddings -- I decided to look through a storage box, where I thought that my Blue Horse coaster was resting. I found it, exactly where I'd stored it, before we moved to Russia (on 10/1/1994).

Well, Tuesday (9/20/2022) was another wonderful shop vacuuming experience. I brought my Blue Horse coaster from the “basement condominium” to my home office. Yesterday, I took the photograph, below, in my office.

I got my coaster as a boy. I don't remember how or when. That coaster has a good degree of wear. At the homeplace, in my teenage years, my coaster sat on my antique dresser – which I had inherited, as I recall, from an ancestor, on Mom's side of the family. Over those years, I'd placed many cups, glasses, and bottles – of warm or cold beverages (i.e., water, milk, buttermilk, tea, Cokes, hot chocolate, etc.) – on that coaster, to protect my dresser. The coaster took the wear.

Conclusion

Thanks, Phil Williams, for inspiring this article! Thanks, Bob Cox, for allowing me to “meet” you on the “Interweb!” I trust that both men know the Good Lord. I've heard Phil Williams state so. Bob Cox writes as if he does.

The inspired Old Testament includes Psalm 90 – A prayer of Moses the man of God.

Our days may come to seventy years, or eighty, if our strength endures; yet the best of them are but trouble and sorrow, for they quickly pass, and we fly away. (Psalms 90:10, NIV)

Teach us to number our days, that we may gain a heart of wisdom. (Psalms 90:12, NIV)

As a teenager – with a cold Coke resting on my coaster, I'd thought about the number of decades that I had left to live. It seemed like a long time.

At age 62 – with my coaster in my home office, I realize how swiftly those decades have flown by, to now. Only the Good Lord knows how many hours, days, weeks, months, years, or decades that I have left, in this temporal existence. I number my days. I have a heart of wisdom. I am ready to go Home!

Many readers know what I mean. Some may not. If you don't know what I mean, and would like to know, you are welcome to contact me – on my Contact Form. I'm just one poor beggar, trying to help other poor beggars find the Bread of Life.


Tuesday, August 02, 2022

“RESIST THE DEVIL, AND HE WILL FLEE FROM YOU” - JUMP FROM THE BARN LOFT: THE HORNETS THEN THE BULL (published 8-2-2022; article #343)

Introduction

Howdy, y'all! To my viewers in East Tennessee, don't we need more rain? It's been too dry for too long! Okay, that was my dry humor – on yet another partly cloudy day. I reckon that the rain may hit later this afternoon, as usual, unless it goes around us again.

The inspiration for this article is from “The Bull and Baseball,” on Blind Pig & the Acorn, 7/22/2022, by guest writer, Garland Davis. Please pause reading here, to read that article. It's a down right funny one! Garland Davis explains how the bull “took up the shortstop’s position.” His words created a video image in my mind! I entered a comment on that article, on 7/22/2022. Thanks, Tipper, for publishing Garland's article!

This is Not the Bull

The photograph, below, is not part of my story. It may, however, help you imagine the video that I hope my story creates in your mind.

Free image of “Black and white bull in the barn” by FreePik

The bull is not “in the barn!” He's in the barnyard. That bull does look as big and mean – as the bull that I hope that my mental image video will create for you.

My Hornets then the Bull Story

The Setting

When I was a boy, Mom and Dad rented the old Livesay place – just off dead man's curve, near Highway 11W. The old farm house had an upstairs and downstairs. The coal furnace was in the unfinished basement. (Mom stored her canning on the basement shelves.) The pump piped spring water from the spring house to the house. (The spring house was about 100 yards or so from the house.) Dad heated with either coal or wood. (I busted up a lot of coal and split a lot of wood.) The wood stove in the living room and the coal or wood stove in the kitchen helped the furnace (when it worked). We knew how to sleep under several layers of blankets in winter. Mom and Dad moved us to our new home, in 1974, the year that I started high school. The old Livesay place served Mom, Dad, and us four boys. (My youngest brother was born in 1973, so he doesn't remember the Livesay place very well.)

The Livesay homeplace was part of the Livesay farm. I had a lot of fun, roaming the fields and hills. Two barns, another barn for tractors and such, a smoke house, a chicken coop, and an old two-seater outhouse were meant for exploring – well, except the outhouse. We had indoor plumbing.

I'm the eldest of four boys. I was lucky to have two guys, my age, nearby. We all lived within a few cow fields of each other. One of the guys had a younger brother, who was about the age of my next to eldest brother. The five of us boys hiked, camped, built a couple of tree houses, jumped our bicycles across cow ponds, swung on grapevines, skated on iced ponds, snow sledded, had firecracker and BB gun wars, had tobacco stick wars in barn rafters, and had a lot of fun together. I'm surprised that we survived childhood.

The “Jump from the Barn Loft” Game

One game that we played was “jump from the barn loft.” One of the barns had a way to climb up to the loft. The loft had a door (usually open) that opened to the ground below (where humans, cattle, tractors, and wagons could come and go). Hay bales could be tossed from the ground up to the loft, or visa versa, through that door. The drop from the loft to the dirt below was about six feet or so – as well as I can remember.

My buddies and I played “jump from the barn loft” often enough. It was fun! We often played tag while doing it. Often in who got tagged order, we'd take turns, in a line, jumping from the loft to the dirt below. We'd go back around, climb back up, and jump again – several times – until we got tired.

My Last Jump

On a fine, sunny, summer day, the five of us boys were hard at our game! We'd been at it a while. It was getting close to noon – or dinner time – or “lunch,” as Northerners call it. Mom had vittles for us. We were hungry.

I was the last to jump. My buddies had already jumped and headed to the house. I must have been piddling around a while by myself. (Start your mental video recording now.) I smacked the top of the loft, with my left hand, before I jumped. I remember yelling “Geronimo!” I was feeling my oats!

The Hornets then the Bull

I don't know why that we hadn't seen the hornets nest, up in the dark, left corner! I had smacked their nest. The hornets came after me, as I landed on the barn floor.

The bull greeted me. (We had been warned to watch out for him. We hadn't seen him. I saw him, about a second after I'd jumped!) He was standing near where I'd landed, looking mean. He dug one front hoof into the dirt. He snorted.

I took off running out of the barn, through the field, and toward the house! The fence line was about 40 yards away from the barn. The house was about another 100 or more yards from the fence line. The hornets stung me a few times. The bull chased me. I could hear him snort – as I ran -- while the hornets were stinging me.

I out ran the bull and slid under the barbed wire fence, just in time. (Our dogs, Bandit and Blackie, had dug out a spot under the fence, so they could cross under.) That saved me from the bull!

The hornets were still after me. I had to jump over a gate, to get to the gravel road that lead to the house. (Usually, I'd climb over the gate. I managed to jump over it that day!) I ran into the kitchen through the open screen door. I recall hollering, “Open the door! Hornets are chasing me!” Someone held the door open. The metal spring closed the door automatically, once I was inside. That stopped the hornets. Hornets bounced against that screen door a while but left finally.

Mom, bless her heart, treated my hornet stings – about four or five, mostly on my neck and head. I finally ate my dinner. I had to take it easy a couple of days, so Mom could keep treating the hornet stings until they healed. My buddies and I didn't play “jump from the barn loft” a while – if we ever did again. (You may turn off your mental video recording. Be sure to save the tape!)

Conclusion

Over the years, I have told my “the hornets then the bull” story many times. I've told it to young folks – at youth rallies, at church camps, and so forth – to make a spiritual point, which I will do next.

The inspired apostle Peter wrote:

Humble yourselves, therefore, under God’s mighty hand, that he may lift you up in due time. Cast all your anxiety on him because he cares for you.

Be alert and of sober mind. Your enemy the devil prowls around like a roaring lion looking for someone to devour. Resist him, standing firm in the faith, because you know that the family of believers throughout the world is undergoing the same kind of sufferings.

And the God of all grace, who called you to his eternal glory in Christ, after you have suffered a little while, will himself restore you and make you strong, firm and steadfast. To him be the power for ever and ever. Amen. (1 Peter 5:6-11, NIV)

The inspired James wrote:

Submit yourselves, then, to God. Resist the devil, and he will flee from you. (James 4:7, NIV)

I “resisted” those hornets and that bull – by running away fast! My “resistance” did not force the hornets and the bull to flee from me. I had to flee from them!

The devil, or Satan, is a “roaring lion,” who wishes “to devour” us. Satan, however, is not as powerful as we think he is. When we submit to God, cast our cares on Him, endure suffering a little while, and resist the devil, then Satan will run away from us! Yes, Satan may “devil” us plenty, but it will be only a little while – when we think in the everlasting perspective.

Lord, my faith stands firm and trusts in you! Devil, I resist you, by faith in Christ, so tuck tail and run away from me! Satan, you lose. God wins. I stand firmly with the winning team.

Y'all are welcome to share my “hornets then the bull” story – either just for fun or, more importantly, to help folks tell the devil to go run off somewhere else and to leave them alone! If folks submit to God and resist the devil, that lying Satan will flee from them.


Thursday, July 28, 2022

CADES COVE (published 7-28-2022; article #342)

 Introduction

Mom (Betty Lou Wood Ferrell, 11/24/1932 - 12/27/2000) and Dad (Earl Ferrell, 9/17/1927 - 1/25/2008) took us boys (four of us born from 1960 to 1973) to Cades Cove every now and then. Later in life, Mom and Dad visited Cades Cove, by themselves, several times.

The last conversation that Dad and I had, before he joined Mom, was about he and I taking a trip to Cades Cove. He looked forward to our trip together. We never got to take that trip. Dad is enjoying time with Mom, and many others, in the Heavenly Cove – which must be more beautiful than Cades Cove.

Cades Cove is in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. I'd suggest that you read the History of Cades Cove.

Inspiration for this Article

My May 20, 2022, article highly recommended “Blind Pig & the Acorn.” I still highly recommend Tipper's website! It's for folks who are interested in Appalachian heritage – which should be all folks!

Every few days, I stop by to read or listen a while, at Blind Pig & the Acorn, where there's a fresh article daily. I stopped by earlier today, to catch up on new articles, since my last visit.

Among the great new articles, one caught my eye with the most interest. It is “John McCaulley – Cades Cove,” Blind Pig & the Acorn, 7/27/2022. Tipper wrote:

Cades Cove is one of the most visited places in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, if not the most. It’s never been a favorite place of mine; in fact I’ve only visited the area one time.

Cades Cove is stunningly beautiful. The views will literally take your breath away. There’s old buildings and other interesting things to see, and lots of folks who want to see them. The area is often crowded to the point of cars sitting still in a long line trying to catch a glimpse of the landscape, buildings, and wildlife.

I prefer the solitude of the backwoods, the high ridges, and the deep dark hollers.

Tipper, I agree with you! If you could visit Cades Cove, without all the traffic, it would be much more pleasant. (My “Cades Cove 2007” section, below, explains.)

Cades Cove, John McCaulley (1880 - 1961)

Tipper's 7/27/2022 article references Donnie Laws' YouTube Channel, “APPALACHIA : Donnie Laws East Tennessee Outdoors: History & of Stories of Appalachia.” Donnie Laws has five years worth of videos on Appalachian history and stories! I'd not hear of him before, but I'm glad to know about his website now! I may add his YouTube channel to my “Appalachian Heritage” section.

Donnie Laws published “Appalachia History of Cades Cove the John McCaulley Story,” 7/19/2022. It is a 28-minute presentation on:

Story and life of John McCaulley and his life in the Cades Cove from 1880 till he left it in 1937. A rare audio interview with him from 1960.

John McCaulley (1880 - 1961) begins to speak, in his 1960 interview, about five minutes into the video. John McCaulley was interviewed a year before he passed. John McCaulley and his wife had nine children. Donnie Laws comments before and after the 1960 interview with John McCaulley.

Please pause from reading the rest of this article, until you watch and listen to Donnie Laws' presentation that I have referenced.

Cades Cove 2007

Didn't you enjoy that presentation? I thought that you would!

My July 14, 2022, article mentioned Clingman's Dome, in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. I searched my website and found “no posts matching the query: Cades Cove.” Since my first article (3/6/2006), I've never written about Cades Cove? I was shocked! I wrote 28 articles in 2006 and three in 2008. I wrote nary an article in 2007.

Mrs. Appalachian Irishman and I have taken a number of weekend getaways -- staying in a cabin near the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. We've hiked several trails. One weekend was Friday, June 29, to Monday, July 2, 2007. We visited Cades Cove, and I took sixteen photographs. The following are two that I selected.


As I recall, the view is looking southeast. The weather was warm and partly cloudy. The photograph does not fully capture the amazing panoramic view, which my mind retains.

The cabin was located just off the south loop. I think a shed (partial view) was to the left of me – not the outhouse, which was around back, as I recall. While we explored the cabin interior, I imagined who had lived in the cabin and what their lives were like – until the government forced them off their land, which had been taken from the Cherokees. (See my July 14, 2022, article.)

Mrs. Appalachian Irishman drove our 2000 Toyota Camry (the car that we had at the time). I either rode along or got out and “hiked” the road – depending on how slow or fast the line of cars that we were in was moving. I had on my hiking shoes and ball cap. I had my canteen with me. I hiked much of the eleven-mile loop road, with a sidetrack or two in the cove. It was easier to hike than to sit, crawling along, in our car.

Cades Cove is beautiful and inspiring – except for the traffic. On Wednesdays, from May 4th through September 28th, of this year, the park restricts vehicles. Visitors may either walk or bicycle the eleven-mile loop road (which is paved). I wonder if my wife and I will hike Cades Cove on a Wednesday one of these days. I doubt it. The route from the house to Cades Cove, which I'd take, is about a two-hour drive, one way. We'd have to overnight in a cabin, on Tuesday, hike Cades Cove on Wednesday, and return home. Molly, our doggy, would miss us. I don't know if we could take Molly along. We will see. The park needs to set Saturdays, not Wednesdays, as the day for hikers or bicyclers. That's my opinion. Feel free to make it your own!

Conclusion

Like John McCaulley (1880 - 1961), Papaw Marion Ferrell (4/13/1880 - 11/21/1970) was also born in 1880. Papaw Ferrell lived his life in the Cave Springs area of Hawkins County, Tennessee. His wife, Mollie Gertrude Archer Ferrell (11/30/1892 - 6/11/1971), had eight children that lived past infancy. Their eighth child was my father. I was born in 1960 – the same year that John McCaulley was interviewed. The following is a photograph of Granny and Papaw Ferrell, in their younger years.


Cades Cove is down right pretty. The Cherokee lived in the cove, from time immemorial. Settlers took the cove from the Cherokee. The government took the cove from the settlers' descendants. Life goes on – sometimes – but not often – for the good. Just give me a horse and a dirt road, and let me live in the cove – the Heavenly Cove.

Dad has everlasting joy, with Mom and many others, in the Heavenly Cove. The last conversation that Dad and I had, before he passed, was about our plan to visit Cades Cove together.

Dad, tell Mom, and all the others up there, that I'm coming up to walk in the Cove with you! Well, I don't recon that I'll get there today, but my plan is to get there – by God's grace and my faith response!


Thursday, July 14, 2022

THE SOLID ROCK: CLINGMAN'S DOME or KUWAHI or CHRIST? (published 7-14-2022; article #339)

Introduction

Over the years, I have enjoyed several trips to Clingman's Dome, in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Mom and Dad took us boys there. I think that I took a girlfriend or two there. I've been there alone and with family and friends.

Mrs. Appalachian Irishman and I have been there. On 10/28/2007, I took the photograph, below, of the observation tower on Clingman's Dome. Mrs. Appalachian Irishman is standing, center, in the light blue sweatshirt. You're “busted” dear!

Once, after Mom (Betty Lou Wood Ferrell, 11/24/1932 - 12/27/2000) went to see Jesus, Dad (Earl Ferrell, 9/17/1927 - 1/25/2008) admitted to us boys that he's walked up the short and paved but steep trail, to the overlook, and walked up the ramp to the viewing area (where Mrs. Appalachian Irishman is standing in the photograph above). Dad had known damage to his ticker (heart). Dad knew what he could and couldn't do. He knew what he could do, if he took his time. Dad hiked Clingman's Dome – even with his bad ticker! Yes, Dad was tough.

Clingman's Dome” not “Clingmans Dome”

The Great Smoky Mountains National Park website has an article on “Clingman[']s Dome.” Y'all might want to check out the article.

I must correct the common grammatical error! It is “Clingman's Dome” – not “Clingmans Dome!” The apostrophe needs to come before the 's' – as I will explain momentarily!

Clingman's Dome Could Be Renamed “Kuwahi”

The Land Changed Hands

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, a sovereign nation, may petition the USSA federal government, to return the original Cherokee name “Kuwahi” to Clingman's Dome. I heard this the other day, on the local TV news. Of several sources, I have selected, for this article, TheSmokies.com post, “Clingman[']s Dome may soon receive a new name; what you should know,” by John Gullion, updated 7/8/2022. The Tribal Council considers the petition today (7/14/2022).

Kuwahi” means “Mulberry Place,” in English. Kuwahi has historical significance to the Cherokee people. I suggest that you read the article that I have referenced. The Cherokee people, as a larger nation, had lived in the land for centuries. The Eastern Band of Cherokees, as a much smaller nation, still lives there.

The federal government forced the native Cherokee people off their land – in the Trail of Tears (1830 - 1850). In my bookcase, I have the book, by John Ehle (12/13/1925 - 3/24/2018), “Trail of Tears: The Rise and Fall of the Cherokee Nation,” published in 1988. I bought and read the book years ago. The moral failure of this once great nation to the Cherokee people is profoundly sad, as an understatement. The ideal principal, in the Pledge of Allegiance, of “liberty and justice for all,” failed the Cherokee nation. Settlers took over their land – for about a hundred years.

Of course, the USSA government has owned the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, for almost a hundred years. The United States Congress chartered the park, in 1934. President Franklin D. Roosevelt dedicated the park, in 1940. (One source is Great Smoky Mountains Association, History of the Smokies.) The Great Smoky Mountains National Park started during the Great Depression. The New Deal, of socialism, was underway.

By the way, I happened to find, at Social History for Every Classroom (SHEC), an interesting letter of 3/7/1934. See “Anonymous, 'A Citizen Claims the New Deal is a Path Towards Socialism,' SHEC: Resources for Teachers.” New Deal socialism concerned that writer, eighty-eight years ago. That concern has been ongoing. Dad and Mom were children, in 1934.

The creation of the park forced the settlers -- whose ancestors had taken the land from the Cherokee -- off their land. The “greater good” paid those folks a little money – even if they didn't want to sell – to get them off their land. This was another moral failure in American history – from the stand point of “liberty and justice for all.”

The land has changed hands three times: the Cherokee, to the settlers, to the USSA government. In the current “woke” (whatever that is) culture, names are changing, monuments are coming down, and history is being rewritten. I understand why the Eastern Band of Cherokee wants to rename Clingman's Dome to Kuwahi. (See my next section.)

Thomas Clingman

The North Carolina History Project article, “Thomas Clingman (1812 – 1897),” written by Jonathan Martin, details the life of Thomas Clingman, after whom Clingman's Dome was named. (That's why “Clingman's” is correct, not “Clingmans.”) Clingman was a Democrat, who served in the United States Senate, from 1858 until 1861. He thought, in error, that one man could own another (slavery). He held the rank of colonel in the Confederate Army, during the War Between the States.

I had never known the story behind the naming of Clingman's Dome mountain, until I learned – a few days ago – that the the Eastern Band of Cherokee wants to rename Clingman's Dome to Kuwahi. Again, I understand why they want to rename their ancestral mountain.

Knox County, Tennessee, Needs to be Renamed!

I thought that I would learn how Knox County, Tennessee, got its name – along with the city of Knoxville. I did the research.

From City of Knoxville, “Fun Facts About Knoxville,” I learned:

Indians were the first settlers of Knoxville and East Tennessee. By the time the first European settlers appeared, the Cherokees dominated the region.

Knoxville was named after Henry Knox, President Washington's War Secretary.

Who was Henry Knox? US History includes “Historic Valley Forge, Who Served Here? General Henry Knox: Page 2,” which states, in part, as follows (with my bold yellow highlighting added):

Knox was elected Secretary at War by Congress in 1785, and in 1789 he was appointed Secretary of War in President Washington's new cabinet.

Conflicts with various groups of Native peoples primarily occupied Knox in his role as Secretary of War. Knox oversaw a government policy of steady removal of native people, including the Creek and Cherokee, from their traditional lands.

The Cherokee people did not receive “liberty and justice for all” – due to Henry Knox (and others, as I am sure). My further research found that the general area, of and around Knoxville and Knox County, was a hunting ground for the Cherokee people. See The Knoxville Focus archived article, by Mike Steely and City of Knoxville, “History of the City.”

I would understand, if the Eastern Band of Cherokees wanted to petition the Knox County government and the Knoxville City government, to rename Knox County and Knoxville to an appropriate Cherokee name.

After all, my ancestry is predominately Irish, and I know the oppression that the Irish endured, by the British Empire and as immigrants to America. (See, for example, my March 10, 2021 and January 30, 2022 articles.) I don't like “the fighting Irish” as the nickname for the University of Notre Dame football team – even if the name may signify a positive meaning!

Conclusion

It is the choice of my readers, to determine if I write this article in sarcastic humor or seriously. The Irish in me doesn't even know! Perhaps I write with both sarcasm and seriousness. Go woke or go broke! Y'all figure it out.

If the USSA government decides to rename Clingman's Dome to Kuwahi – as the USSA demise into “Socialist Utopian Oblivion” continues – then I won't mind saying “Kuwahi.” Please, however, forgive me, if my slip of the tongue says “Clingman's Dome!” I would not want to be “canceled!” The Irish in me would like to see anyone try to “cancel” me!

This once great nation did not follow the biblical worldview – by taking land from the Cherokees and by engaging in many other points of evil. This once great nation still does not follow the biblical worldview – in majority.

Wake up (not “woke up”), America! Return to the principals of the founding fathers – which are based on the biblical worldview! Stand on the Rock. All other ground is sinking sand.

Edward Mote, in 1834, wrote the hymn, “My Hope is Built on Nothing Less.” Verse one:

My hope is built on nothing less
Than Jesus’ blood and righteousness.
I dare not trust the sweetest frame,
But wholly lean on Jesus’ Name.
On Christ the solid Rock I stand,
All other ground is sinking sand;
All other ground is sinking sand.

The inspiration for the hymn is the conclusion of Jesus' “Sermon on the Mount” (in Matthew 5:1 - 7:28):

Therefore everyone who hears these words of mine and puts them into practice is like a wise man who built his house on the rock. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house; yet it did not fall, because it had its foundation on the rock. But everyone who hears these words of mine and does not put them into practice is like a foolish man who built his house on sand. The rain came down, the streams rose, and the winds blew and beat against that house, and it fell with a great crash. (Matthew 7:24-27, NIV)

I have finished and published my sermon finally. Do I hear an amen? I am still thinking about doing a podcast sermon – audio and video.


Friday, May 20, 2022

APPALACHIAN HERITAGE: “BLIND PIG AND THE ACORN” HIGHLY RECOMMENDED! (published 5-20-2022; article #328)

Introduction

Howdy, y'all! I'm enjoying my fifth day of State of Tennessee retirement! Today, I spread the four bags of mulch that Mrs. Appalachian Irishman and I bought at Lowe's, on 5/15/2022 (Sunday afternoon).

Yesterday, my '06 Frontier and I tried Lowe's first. Their fancy saw was not working – despite what the lady had told me by phone, on 5/18/2022. So, we (my truck and I) went to Home Depot. I bought a piece of wood that Chris sawed to the proper dimensions for me, at no extra cost. My 'bionic' right foot endured the walking on concrete and asphalt – well enough. Conclusion, you ask?

See my Monday, April 6, 2020, article “4/5/20, SUNDAY, UPDATE.” In that article, I mentioned the purchase of my L-shaped home office desk – with a couple of parts missing. In time, Office Max-Depot sent me one part. They never sent the drawer for part AA! I fought them hard. I'll never buy anything from Office Max-Depot again!

Yesterday, I installed the Home Depot manufactured drawer for part AA (bottom left drawer)! My 3/21/2020 purchase of L-shaped home office desk is – FINALLY – fully installed!

That was a “life, such as it was,” update, by introduction. Let's get to the meat and potatoes of this article!

Blind Pig and the Acorn

Last weekend, I was going through my list of about twenty-six “blogs” that I'd bookmarked, starting in 2006. Most of those websites are either down or no longer active. I found a few that were still active – having transitioned from “blog” websites to ongoing websites.

I was glad to know that Blind Pig and the Acorn is still active! The website will explain the reason for that title.

On 5/14/2022, Saturday, I posted a comment on the article “Shocking Mountains,” May 14, 2022:

Howdy, Tipper! I hope that you and yours are getting along well enough! It’s been a while. You made a great comment, on my Saturday, December 12, 2009, article, “House Mountain & Devil’s Nose” (https://www.appalachianirishman.com/2009/12/house-mountain-devils-nose.html). I’m glad to “stop by, with a cup of coffee,” to visit you a while! I am very glad to know that you have been keeping your website active! (I’ve been doing the same.) If you don’t mind, I plan to link your website, in my “Appalachian Heritage” section of websites. May God bless you and yours! I’m still standing here. I ain’t breathing hard! See my “I’M STILL ALIVE – WHY? (Published 8/26/2016)” article for details.

Tipper replied to my 5/17/2022 email, on 5/19/2022. She granted me permission to cite her website, in my “APPALACHIAN HERITAGE” section! Her website, as of today, joins the other four websites in that section.

Thanks, Tipper, for your permission, your daily articles on Appalachian heritage, and for having kept your website going all these years! We are a few, from almost a decade ago, who are still standing! May God bless you and yours! Thanks, by the way, for your 5/19/2022 comment on my “I’M STILL ALIVE – WHY? (Published 8/26/2016)” article. I'll express my appreciation here. I'll send you an email reply, once I publish this article!

Conclusion

I have several more articles in rough draft, or in my mind. I have more time to write my articles! State retirement is great – so far! Dear Lord, may the situation continue!

Y'all keep turnin' right and goin' straight out there! It's the only way to wind up on the right side, at judgment day. It's the only way that this once great nation can return to its godly roots.


Monday, May 09, 2022

ADVANCE KNOX UPDATE: I AM IMPRESSED & ENCOURAGED (published 5-9-2022; article #322)

 Introduction

To my Knox County area readers, aren't you happy that the morning clouds turned to crisp, blue sky! The last three days of clouds, storms, and rain are gone! To my readers in other states and nations, I hope that y'all are doing well.

This article is follow up to my first article yesterday, “ADVANCE KNOX PSYCHOBABBLE UPDATE: CRICKETS STILL CHIRP (published 5-8-2022; article #318).”

As a side note, the Advance Knox Comments Section has not yet published my 5/6/2022, at 5:17 PM, comment. They don't have to do so. My article yesterday published the comment. I have the email from Advance Knox that thanked me for my input.

The Phone Conversation

The gentleman, whom I mentioned yesterday, in my article on this topic, called me, at 9:30 AM on the dot! The six weeks of awaiting a phone call were over! The gentleman and I talked forty-five minutes. (I took an extended break, from my work-at-home day!) The conversation was pleasant and informative.

First, as educated and experienced country boys, we shared the snapshot stories of our lives. We got to know each other. We are both educated country boys, who were raised right. We share the same God-given values.

After having become acquainted, we conversed about the Advance Knox “spider web” of bureaucracy. The gentleman appreciated my analogy. We discussed several points. I won't go into all the details. I remember them.

The bottom line is that the spider web of Advance Knox bureaucracy appears to drive the same agenda that I am driving. Hiking, I have pushed through many spider webs, to get to a ridge line. Advance Knox seems to be pushing through the spider webs.

What is the agenda? The fifty-eight entities and individuals that compose the spider web of Advance Knox appear to want to keep rural areas rural, to restrict the developer-driven attempt to build more “McMansion” subdivisions, to reduce the profound traffic congestion, and to use common sense, as Knox County continues to grow.

Sidetrack on Northerners vs. Yankees

We can't stop folks in other states from moving into the county. I don't blame the folks who are trying to get out of “blue” states, as they are called. “Blue state” “Socialist Utopian Oblivion” planning is the incubator for USSA “Socialist Utopian Oblivion” planning.

Please allow this sidetrack. I must define, again, the difference between a northerner and a Yankee. I quote from my very first article, “HOW TO PRONOUNCE 'APPALACHIAN' (First Article; Published 3/6/2006).”

Oh, regarding "Yankee," there is a difference between a northerner who simply moves into Appalachia and a Yankee! A northerner may have been born somewhere else, but he is proud of Appalachian values, heritage, and culture and tries to fit in, without trying to change us. A Yankee, on the other hand, is a haughty, arrogant, blankety blank who thinks that he knows it all and comes down here to educate us "poor, dumb folks." A Yankee tries to force his politically correct "tolerance" on us (a contradiction in itself), and we just laugh at him behind his back--or do worse if he gets too uppity! Now, do you understand the difference? Good!

That first article continues to draw readers! I have had many comments, with my replies, over the years. The last comment, with my reply, was on 4/13/2015. Now that I have educated my readers, again, on the difference between a northerner and a Yankee, I will move on!

Conclusion

If someone, anyone, from Advance Knox had called me sooner, based on my 3/29/2022 request, I would have been more impressed and encouraged.

The gentleman's call to me today impressed and encouraged me. My comment, today (5/9/2022, 4:50 PM), on the Advance Knox Comments website is:

Update to my 5/1/2022 comment: a fine, educated, country boy, who is part of the Advance Knox spider web of bureaucracy, called me today (5/9/2022), at 9:30 AM on the dot. We talked 45 minutes. I am impressed and encouraged. My opinion now is that Advance Knox is doing all that it can, to prevent urban sprawl into mostly rural areas and to use wisdom for new growth in the county. The gentleman is welcome to arrange a face-to-face visit with me. I'd like to look him in the eye and tell him thanks, in person! Advance Knox, y'all keep on doing right, for us! Thank you. See my 5/9/2022 article, on my website, Appalachian Irishman.

I wonder if they will publish my 5/9/2022 comment. We will see.

I hope that the gentleman, when he is in our area, calls me, as I had invited him to do so. I'd like to sit down, with a cup of coffee for both of us, to talk in person.